International investing: Still a journey to consider

Columbus Day is observed on Oct. 9. And while it may be true that Leif Erikson and the Vikings beat Columbus to the New World, Columbus Day nonetheless remains important in the public eye, signifying themes such as exploration and discovery. As an investor, you don’t have to cross the ocean blue, as Columbus did, to find opportunities. But it may be a good idea to put some of your money to work outside the United States.

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A holistic approach to aging’s ‘new normal’

 “How Do I Get There from Here?” by George H. Schofield, 2017, Amacom, $16.95, 237 pages. White sandy beaches. Waves that gently kiss your toes with warm water. In your minds’ eye, they stretch for miles and they’re yours to explore. That will be your retirement — or so you hope.

Not investing carries risk

You’ve no doubt heard about the risks associated with investing. “This investment carries this type of risk, while that investment carries another one.” And it is certainly true that all investments do involve some form of risk. But what about not investing? Isn’t there some risk associated with that, too? In fact, by staying on the investment sidelines or at least by avoiding long-term, growth-oriented investments, you may incur several risks.

Social media and workers’ comp fraud

The no-fault nature of the Vermont workers’ compensation system means that almost any worker injured on the job will receive benefits. That system relies on an assumption of truthfulness from the injured worker as to the circumstances, extent and nature of the injury. When an injured worker is found to have misrepresented their injury, it’s possible the employer will be able to defend against the claim or discontinue ongoing benefits. This past spring the Vermont Legislature passed legislation addressing employees’ social media account privacy and prohibitions. The law goes into effect on Jan.

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Chose your own adventure: The work book

“In a Daze Work” by Siobhán Gallagher, 2017, TarcherPerigee, $16, 156 pages. They say you can choose your mood. If you want to be happy tomorrow, then be happy. Want to get rid of the blahs? It’s all mind over matter: Pick some other way to be and don’t forget to tell yourself.

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With stories of the road, ‘Long Haul’ moves well

“The Long Haul” by Finn Murphy, 2017, W.W. Norton, $26.95, 229 pages
From here to there. That’s where you need to move your stuff: from Point A to Point B. Take it out of one place and put it in another, possibly many miles away. And it’s not like you can wiggle your nose or wave a magic wand to do it, either. You need someone who knows what he or she is doing. In “The Long Haul” by Finn Murphy, there’s somebody like that out there.

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‘Popular’ will set you right back in the playground

“Popular: The Power of Likability in a Status-Obsessed World” by Mitch Prinstein, 2017, Viking, $27, 273 pages.  None of the other kids like you. They don’t include you in anything. In fact, they often just plain ignore you, and some even pick on you. You don’t understand why this is, but there isn’t much you can do: Quitting your job is not an option.

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‘Fully Connected’ won’t help cure information overload

“Fully Connected: Surviving and Thriving in an Age of Overload” by Julia Hobsbawm, 2017, Bloomsbury, $28, 256 pages
Your phone will not stop ringing. It chimes constantly, too, letting you know that you’ve got mail. Facebook announces itself with a “thwock,” and another noise works as a calendar notification. On one hand, it’s nice to be needed. On the other hand, you’d like to throw everything into a nearby river and walk away.

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Women struggle to balance student debt, life goals

After the grueling pace of graduate school, obtaining that advanced degree and finding a great professional career path, many women can finally turn their attention to other life choices. One choice they’ll be faced with is what to do with the substantial student loan debt. More importantly, how do they balance enjoyment of life while paying off those looming loans, as well as all the other pressures women face? Women hold nearly two-thirds of the current student loan debt in the United States, and “women working full-time with college degrees make 26 percent less than their male colleagues” according to a study by the American Association of University Women. That means that as a busy professional woman, you are not alone in feeling the challenge of trying to balance career, life and your loans.

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An advertising revolution is brewing

“The End of Advertising” by Andrew Essex, 2017, Spiegel & Grau, $27, 240 pages. Say goodbye to your money. You need that new gadget, so adios. New bling is too irresistible, so ta-ta. Upgrade that device; see ya later, salary.